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If you want to work at Netflix, you might have to answer some hard interview questions first. Using Glassdoor’s information about Netflix, we’ve compiled some of the most difficult questions that people say they have been asked while interviewing for the streaming company.

  • 'Tell me something that you did in the past, but don't want to do ever again.' - Engineer candidate
  • 'How many cans of paint would you need to paint one wing of a 747?' - Marketing manager candidate
  • 'What does the word empathy mean?' - Customer service representative candidate
  • 'Of everyone on your team at your current employer, who would you keep and who would you fire and why?' - Senior software engineer candidate
  • 'How would you determine if the price of a Netflix subscription is truly the deciding factor for a consumer?' - Market research analyst candidate
  • 'How would you deal with extreme deadline pressure and a frantic work pace?' - Engineer candidate
  • 'How do you handle managing someone that is more than twice your age?' - Operations manager candidate
  • 'What would you do if you were the CEO?' - Partner Product Group candidate
  • 'What would you tell someone that is calling to talk about how Blockbuster is better than Netflix?' - Customer service representative candidate
Read them all on Business Insider

Thoughts
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No one could have taught you more about starting a company than Steve Jobs, and Guy Kawasaki had the privilege and honour of working for him in the Macintosh division of Apple. Over the course of several years, and then watching him for another two decades, these are the five most important things that I learned about startups from him.
1. People cannot tell you what they need. 2. Experts cannot tell you what to do. 3. The action is on the next curve. 4. Design counts.
 
Read them all on Fortune

Thoughts
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During Summer 2011, I started my first internship at Google HQ in Mountain View, California. Many thoughts raced through my mind as my start date neared... 1. Be confident that you deserve to be where you are in life. 2. If you don't know the answer to something, don't pretend that you do. 3. Work-life integration is really important. 4. Solving hard problems is actually not as hard as it seems. 5. Quality connections over quantity of connections. 6. Speak up in meetings and don't wait to be called on. 7. Welcome feedback. 8. Don't forget to live in the moment and reflect on the present. Read them all on Business Insider

Thoughts
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Continuing on the Business Foundations Specialization on Coursera I have started to learn the basics on improving business processes. The basic overview on operations is how to increase productivity and deliver higher quality standards, most people see the focus on creating cost efficiencies but it also has a lot to do with the quality of service that is provided at every step of the customer experience. Key concepts include process analysis, bottlenecks, flows rates, and inventory levels, and more.

The Four Dimensions of Performance:

  • time / responsiveness
  • variety
  • quality
  • price / cost / efficiency
Cost:
  • Efficiency
  • Labour
  • Customers
Quality:
  • Product quality - how good?
    • customer service
  • Process quality - as good as promised?
Variety:
  • customer heterogeneity (the vast majority)
  • # items sold
  • % requests made happy
Time:
  • Responsiveness to demand
Efficient frontier: where all other players in the industry sit. (inside to the lower left)  

Learnings