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Workflow & Productivity
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No one could have taught you more about starting a company than Steve Jobs, and Guy Kawasaki had the privilege and honour of working for him in the Macintosh division of Apple. Over the course of several years, and then watching him for another two decades, these are the five most important things that I learned about startups from him.
1. People cannot tell you what they need. 2. Experts cannot tell you what to do. 3. The action is on the next curve. 4. Design counts.
 
Read them all on Fortune

Thoughts
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Several years ago we came up with a great idea for a new leadership-development offering we thought would be valuable to everyone. We had research demonstrating that when people embarked on a self-development program, their success increased dramatically when they received follow-up encouragement...
But we wanted a more objective answer. In an effort to understand the root cause of poor decision making, we looked at 360-feedback data from more than 50,000 leaders and compared the behavior of those who were perceived to be making poor decisions with that of the people perceived to be making very good decisions.
  1. Laziness.
  2. Not anticipating unexpected events.
  3. Indecisiveness.
  4. Remaining locked in the past.
  5. Having no strategic alignment. 
  6. Over-dependence. 
  7. Isolation. 
  8. Lack of technical depth.
  9. Failure to communicate the what, where, when, and how associated with their decisions.
Read more at the Harvard Business Review

Thoughts
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The Australian startup scene is truly up and running, and notable success stories, including Atlassian and Campaign Monitor, are encouraging overseas investors to come Down Under to take a look.
There are two things I really admire about Australian startups. The first is the fact that they're in Australia forces them to build a global business. Australia is an interesting market, but it's too small for you to be a billion dollar business by itself. In terms of Atlassian or Campaign Monitor, they don't just say 'I'm going to build a tool for people in Australia,' but rather I'm going to build a worldwide business in 50-plus countries.
One such person is Wesley Chan, managing director at respected Silicon Valley venture fund Felicis Ventures, who was in Australia Thursday to visit two of his local investments: online graphic design platform, Canva, and employee satisfaction analytics firm, Culture Amp. Read more at Mashable

Thoughts